Victoria: Substitute Canned Salmon for Tuna

by

fishsticks2

May 24, 2009

In last night’s open thread at Mudflats ChiCat reported that she tried a recipe for salmon fish sticks that Victoria had posted a while back.

UgaVic,
A few weeks ago you recommended making fish sticks from canned salmon–I finally tried it and both my son and husband loved them! Thank you!

Several readers asked for the recipe so she reposted it this morning.

FISH STICKS OR FISH BALL recipe :-))
I had a little bird tell me the discussion was going on for the recipe.
We do all sorts of versions so this one is workable too but might be slightly different than the original –
Canned salmon – we use skinless boneless only cause that is what we process at our plant BUT any works- just stir the can so all parts are mushed.
6 ounces of salmon + 1 egg+ ~ 1/2 cup rice krispies (I use bread crumbs when out) and any seasoning you like- we do cajun, Old Bay, etc.
Use about 1 -2 tsp per 6 ounces.
Mush all together – form patties, balls or sticks.
Can brown with a good non-stick skillet or bake in oven 400 for 20-30 minutes.
So much of this is just see as you go but you get the idea:-))
Kids love the Rice Krispie idea so that helps.
Some time soon will try and do other simple ones.
Remember pretty much anything you use for tuna canned salmon can be used.
Hope this spurs lots of ideas :-))

I wanted to post it here but had to make a batch in order to get a photo – such an easy recipe!

I didn’t have Rice Krispies so I used Panko breadcrumbs because I had them. If you use crumbs, add them a little at a time – ½ cup is too much. Next time I’ll venture out and get Rice Krispies – they would make a light, crunchy treat.

With lemon, pepper & dill (from the backyard) sauce and one of the 27 mangos from the kitchen counter, this was a tasty project.

~ Jane

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12 Responses to “Victoria: Substitute Canned Salmon for Tuna”

  1. Martha Unalaska Yard Sign Says:

    What a gorgeous picture. Salmon makes a lovely summer lunch or dinner – or breakfast, or a snack, or snunch (that’s a dog term for late breakfast when mom forgets).

  2. UgaVic Says:

    Well Miss Martha —
    I have to tell you that a snunch, as is lunch breakfast and dinner, for our puppers right now is canned salmon since ‘mom’ forgot to order dog food in time.
    We are hearing that the lab is turning up her nose up at canned salmon after almost a week of it- of course mixed with a few other goodies at times!
    I am in the dog house on that subject right now!!:-))

  3. Martha Unalaska Yard Sign Says:

    Vic – your dogs would be the envy of my cats – who would just LOVE the opportunity to get sick of salmon. They only get once a week or so (I guess I could increase that frequency?) so they want to climb on my head to get to the salmon. That is just not allowed – mostly because I’m busy trying to eat it, too and that’s hard to do with two cats on your head.

  4. Pat, Washington state Says:

    That recipe is similar to one that I loved as a kid and still make. We use the canned salmon, and take out all the bones and skin (I’ve never seen the boneless skinless kind – that would be nice).

    And we add an egg and left-over mashed potatoes. If the mixture isn’t stiff enough, I add some cracker crumbs and then divide it into balls and roll those in the cracker crumbs before I flatten it into patties. It just needs to be fried till both sides are lightly browned. We put a pat of butter on the top and a little pepper. Yum, one of my favorite meals.

    (We don’t have any pets now, but the cat used to love salmon – turned his nose up at tuna or any other fish. He also loved steak, but not hamburger. Go figure, we had a stray cat with gormet tastes.)

  5. the problem child Says:

    Pat, your recipe sounds like the salmon croquettes that my mom makes! Same ingredients (including canned salmon, of course, though can be made with leftover poached or grillled), make balls (but don’t squish them flat), then deep fried quickly.

  6. anonymousbloggers Says:

    Pat & problem child,

    My mom also called them croquettes and I vaguely remember a sauce. It probably wasn’t memorable because food in the mid-west in the fifties was pretty bland.

    Jane

  7. lgardener Says:

    One of my favorite canned salmon recipes is to take leftover rice, saute some onions, garlic and peppers, mix in the salmon with salt and pepper to taste, then add three eggs, mix and put in greased cast iron skillet and bake in a 350 degree oven for about 35 minutes. If you’re feeling ambitious, you can put in a pie shell, then sprinkle with some grated cheese. yum. Salmon “quiche”.

  8. Secret TalkerΔ Says:

    My Mom made salmon croquettes too (Joy of Cooking-pg.220; includes mashed potatoes, but Mom’s were dry) What is your sauce?we always ate everything plain?(Except burgers or meatloaf) Seems to me that salmon croquettes must have been a traditional popular American recipe. Interesting.
    I know that there was The Libby Cannery in Kenai even before 1940 which packed the plentiful King Salmon. Women did the packing by hand or worked the machine that fabricated the tins. Work started in late May and lasted thru the season in August, with the workers living in tents at the cannery.The women earned 45 cents an hour and 3 meals with coffee breaks. However the hours varied due to the size of the catch.It was a good way to earn money.

  9. anonymousbloggers Says:

    I wonder how much a can of salmon sold for then.

  10. Secret TalkerΔ Says:

    Dunno$#. please, what is your salmon sauce?

  11. anonymousbloggers Says:

    Secret Talker,

    I think it was mayo and sour cream – to taste. I added lemon juice and a little zest, fresh dill and black pepper.

    After Vic sent the recipe I wanted to get the post up but wanted a photo. I didn’t want to go to the store so I made it with things I had here.

    Sorry not to be more helpful.

  12. Secret TalkerΔ Says:

    I have it—a sour cream dill sauce,perhaps with some diced cucumbers.I bought the bread crumbs today. Thanks

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